We Need to Talk about Romanticism

The whole exuberance, anarchy and violence of modern art … its unrestrained, unsparing exhibitionism, is derived from [Romanticism]. And this subjective, egocentric attitude has become so much a matter of course for us … that we find it impossible to reproduce even an abstract train of thought without talking about our own feelings.

— Arnold Hauser, (1892–1978), A Social History of Art , Vol. 3, p. 166 Whence this secret Chain between each Person and Mankind? How is my Interest connected with the most distant Parts of it?

— Francis Hutcheson (1694–1746), An Inquiry into the Original of our Ideas of Beauty and Virtue (1725), Treatise II: An Inquiry concerning Moral Good and Evil, Sect. I. Classicism is health, romanticism is sickness.

— Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe (1749-1832) We have never intended to enlighten shoemakers and servants—this is up to apostles . Voltaire (1694–1778) When we are asked now: are we now living into an enlightened age? Then the answer is: No, but in an age of Enlightenment. — Immanuel Kant (1724-1804) Anthony Pagden, The Enlightenment: And Why it Still Matters (Oxford Uni Press, 2015) p. 72/73. Michael L Frazer , The Enlightenment of Sympathy: Justice and the Moral Sentiments in the Eighteenth Century and Today (Oxford Uni Press, 2010) p. 126/127. Robert C Solomon, A Passion for Justice: Emotions and the Origins of the Social Contract (Rowman and Littlefield Pub., 1995) p. 13. Ibid., p. 45. Henry Mackenzie , The Man of Feeling (Oxford World’s Classics Oxford Uni Press, 2009. Marilyn Butler, Romantics, Rebels and Reactionaries: English Literature and its Background 1760-1830 (Oxford Uni Press, 1981) p. 31. Marilyn Butler, Romantics, Rebels and Reactionaries: English Literature and its Background 1760-1830 (Oxford Uni Press, 1981) p. 29/30. Ibid., pp. 30/31. Robert C Solomon, A Passion for Justice: Emotions and the Origins of the Social Contract (Rowman and Littlefield Pub., 1995) p. 37. Eugene N. Anderson, German Romanticism as an Ideology of Cultural Crisis, p. 301-312. Journal of the History of Ideas, June, 1941, Vol. 2, No. 3, pp. 301-317. Published by University of Pennsylvania Press. Ibid., pp. 313-314. Ibid., p. 316. Marx and Engels, On Literature and Art (Progress Publishers: Moscow, 1978) p. 270. Ibid., p. 271. Ibid., p. 88. David J. Denby, Individual, universal, national: a French revolutionary trilogy? (Studies of Voltaire and the Eighteenth Century, 335, Voltaire Foundation, 1996) p. 28/29. Ibid., 117. Ibid., p. 27.

2020-08-01 | Art, Enlightenment, Equal Rights | English |